Another French Revolution: Design & Prisunic in the 1970’s

From Terence Conran to Andrée Putman, major names in the design industry embarked upon Prisunic's quest for "Beauty for the price of ugliness", and good design for all. It all started during the 1930's, following the stock market crash of 1929, when famous Parisian department store Le Printemps decided to spruce up and launch a new concept. In 1936, the brand "Prisunic" was born (literally: "unique prices"). From the beginning, this innovative approach met a huge success. Renowned furniture and graphic designers or photographers gradually whipped up the perfect image, offering an avant-garde lifestyle and an affordable "new look" for interiors that left a strong imprint. The epitome of Prisunic's success came in the 1970s. (...)

Remembering Erwin Hauer, master of architectural sculpture

Austrian-American sculptor Erwin Hauer passed away on December 22, 2017, aged 91. Born in 1926, in Vienna, he studied at the Rhode Island School of Design then was invited by Josef Albers to study at Yale University in 1956. Mixing modularity with a mathematical expressiveness, inspired by Henry Moore and the Constructivist sculptors Naum Gabo and Antoine Pevsner, Hauer cast his architectural sculptures from molds in concrete, gypsum and acrylic resin. His screens became emblematic of modernism.

Streamliners: the golden age of lifestyle & design

"Always travel in style": in February 2018, the Victoria & Albert museum will re-imagine the golden age of ocean travel with "Ocean Liners: Speed & Style", an exhibition born from the collaboration between the museum and Viking Cruises. Co-organised by the V&A in London and the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, it is the first ever exhibition to explore the design and cultural impact of the ocean liner on an international scale. It will explore all aspects of ship design from ground-breaking engineering, architecture and interiors to the fashion and lifestyle aboard. Showcasing over 250 objects, including paintings, sculpture, and ship models, alongside objects from shipyards, wall panels, furniture, fashion, textiles, photographs, posters and film. It will display objects never-before-seen in Europe, and reunite objects not seen together since on-board these spectacular vessels, which revolutionised ocean travel from the mid-19th century to the late 20th century.

Blending digital & artisanal techniques: Julio

 French designer Luce Couillet focused on product-design studies at ESAD in Reims, before experimenting with textile creation at ENSCI-Les Ateliers in Paris.Her « Julio » mobiles are hand-woven, crafted using both digital (laser-cutting) and artisanal techniques. Each ellipse is assembled piece by piece and woven on a loom in a rising-descending manner, in order to create a hypnotic, optical game of shadows. The mobile seems to vibrate, displaying shadow games as the mobiles crisscross each other. Made of wood or of paper, the Julio mobile was originally designed by Luce Couillet for and presented at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, on the occasion of the « Conversations » exhibition. All mobiles are custom-made and limited to eight pieces. (…)