Another French Revolution: Design & Prisunic in the 1970’s

From Terence Conran to Andrée Putman, major names in the design industry embarked upon Prisunic's quest for "Beauty for the price of ugliness", and good design for all. It all started during the 1930's, following the stock market crash of 1929, when famous Parisian department store Le Printemps decided to spruce up and launch a new concept. In 1936, the brand "Prisunic" was born (literally: "unique prices"). From the beginning, this innovative approach met a huge success. Renowned furniture and graphic designers or photographers gradually whipped up the perfect image, offering an avant-garde lifestyle and an affordable "new look" for interiors that left a strong imprint. The epitome of Prisunic's success came in the 1970s. (...)

Streamliners: the golden age of lifestyle & design

"Always travel in style": in February 2018, the Victoria & Albert museum will re-imagine the golden age of ocean travel with "Ocean Liners: Speed & Style", an exhibition born from the collaboration between the museum and Viking Cruises. Co-organised by the V&A in London and the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, it is the first ever exhibition to explore the design and cultural impact of the ocean liner on an international scale. It will explore all aspects of ship design from ground-breaking engineering, architecture and interiors to the fashion and lifestyle aboard. Showcasing over 250 objects, including paintings, sculpture, and ship models, alongside objects from shipyards, wall panels, furniture, fashion, textiles, photographs, posters and film. It will display objects never-before-seen in Europe, and reunite objects not seen together since on-board these spectacular vessels, which revolutionised ocean travel from the mid-19th century to the late 20th century.

Blending digital & artisanal techniques: Julio

 French designer Luce Couillet focused on product-design studies at ESAD in Reims, before experimenting with textile creation at ENSCI-Les Ateliers in Paris.Her « Julio » mobiles are hand-woven, crafted using both digital (laser-cutting) and artisanal techniques. Each ellipse is assembled piece by piece and woven on a loom in a rising-descending manner, in order to create a hypnotic, optical game of shadows. The mobile seems to vibrate, displaying shadow games as the mobiles crisscross each other. Made of wood or of paper, the Julio mobile was originally designed by Luce Couillet for and presented at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, on the occasion of the « Conversations » exhibition. All mobiles are custom-made and limited to eight pieces. (…)

Nina Toltstrup: It’s a wardrobe, it’s a divider

London-based Nina Tolstrup's design company Studiomama has created a pastel-hued wardrobe. The "Metamorphic" piece of furniture is made of solid maple wood, cedar wood -a natural repellent for insects- and canvas, equipped with unfolding doors, doubling up as a partition for large rooms. Inspiration came when the designer was looking for ways to reorganize their living/working space. "Instead of building walls and dividing the space up permanently, we found that this solution with a flexible and non-permanent screen to divide the space into two when needed gave us the opportunity to use our space in an optimal way," explained studio co-founder Jack Mama.

Playing house in Eindhoven

Time to play house! During the Dutch Design Week (Oct.18-26), the Dutch Supermodels Doll houses (hotel rooms, offices and exhibition galleries designed to scale) will be displayed at the Klokgebouw. Among the playful creators are designers & architects Makkink & Bey, Ineke Hans, Scholten & Baijings, Frederik Roije, Van Eijk & Van Lubbe, textile designer Claudy Jongstra, wayfinding specialist Mijksenaar, exhibition designers Kossmann.dejong, artist Krijn de Koning, furniture manufacturer DUM.

Studio Juju: OCBC Premier bank & Bend sofa

Studio Juju were engaged by OCBC Bank to design the flagship Premier Bank, in Orchardgateway mall, Singapore. Imagined as "an immersive art gallery experience", the Premier Bank was conceived "as an artwork, like a blank canvas that coax the beauty of colors and timeless character of its materials – the untainted marble floors and walls, dark leathered granite walls, accents of brass and gold, colorful textiles and subtle wood hues." The lounge room showcases the high-backed Bend sofa, designed in collaboration with Singaporean furniture producer Foundry. Mirrored halves give symmetry to the Bend sofa, mounted on a tubular leg frame. Love at the first sight? Good news! The Bend sofa bu Studio Juju is suitable for both contract and domestic use.