Of toothpicks & design: “A Million Time” at Changi Airport, Humans since 1982

It took four years to complete this uncommon clock, that you can admire in the Terminal 2 at Singapore Changi airport, at the entrance of the departure hall. But to be fair, it took over ten years to its designers, Stockholm-based studio Humans since 1982, to refine this one-of-akind concept; the Changi example is one of its variations. "A Million Times" at Changi is both a kinetic sculpture and functioning clock composed of 504 smaller clocks and 1008 motors. With a width of 7.5m, the entire ‘clock face’ is wider than that of London’s Big Ben (7m). Each of the 1008 clock-hands (504-minute hands and 504-hour hands) are fitted with individual motors, giving the kinetic sculpture the ability to show various patterns, as well as the time and greetings in various languages across different times of the day. Bastian Bischoff and Per Emanuelsson are the founders of Humans since 1982. Since meeting as postgraduate students at HDK Göteborg in 2008, the duo are renowned to have produced works that defy easy categorisation, situated between visual art and product design. Creating objects and experiential installations, they describe their work as "analytical, with a healthy dose of escapism".

Joshua Smith’s wonders of “Urban decay”

Miniaturist and artist Joshua Smith’s intricately detailed models of overlooked Sydney buildings celebrate the beauty of urban grime, rust, decay and graffiti. "Urban Decay", showing at the Australian Design Centre (August 2 - September 25), will be his first solo exhibition. Joshua Smith (based in Norwood, South Australia) will unveil five intricately-crafted miniatures of buildings, one roller door and one dumpster, each constructed complete with ad hoc signage, graffiti and urban grime. The Sydney buildings include the Olympia Milk Bar in Stanmore, the Karim building in Wentworth Street and the Ginseng Shop in Haymarket, while a Milk Bar from Joshua's home town Adelaide and a Bodega from Brooklyn, New York round out the set. Smith has previously shown his miniatures in galleries and art fairs in London, Paris, Berlin, New York, Hong Kong, Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide. Formerly a self-taught stencil artist, Joshua ran Espionage Gallery in Adelaide for four years before concentrating on his career as a miniature artist in 2015. The exhibition offers insights into Joshua Smith’s meticulous approach to the creation of the works, including research conducted through Google Maps and photography, and the perfect recreation of each building’s facade in 1:20 scale using a variety of materials.

Chasing Rainbows: Josh Sperling

New York-based artist Josh Sperling's works are exhibited for the first time at Gallery Perrotin Paris (until Feb. 24th). “Chasing Rainbows” brings together a number of new works by the artist: composites—sort of shaped canvases and plywood panels—a series of monochrome canvas reliefs, and a large-scale installation influenced by the Memphis group's furniture and Frank Stella or Ellsworth Kelly.  

The many (food) faces of Enora Lalet

Enora Lalet has been shooting her "Cooking Faces" series, mimicking classical portraits with a technique of her own, for some years. The Bordeaux-based visual artist mixes photography with body paint, culinary design, sewing, collages with an anthropological focus.

Let’s Party: Kids only, with Liu Bolin and Studio GGSV

You might regret not being 10 years old anymore... One of the most iconic contemporary art museums in the world, the Centre Pompidou, A.K.A. Beaubourg, is celebrating its 40th birthday. Acclaimed designers Gaëlle Gabillet and Stéphane Villard (Studio GGSV) have been invited, on this occasion, to imagine an entirely new kind of event for the Children's Gallery. « Galerie Party », a story in three acts, takes place in a fantasy garden, where a strange house has been erected. The second act has just been unveiled. Brace yourselves (and get your kids ready): from September 9, 2017 to January 8, 2018, Chinese artist Liu Bolin, « The Invisible Man » himself, will hide – wearing his hand-panted costume matching the background, as usual- in the disruptive decor created by Studio GGSV at the crossroads of architecture and design. On the inaugural night, Liu Bolin will perform in front of the public one of his emblematic photographs-performances which allows him to camouflage himself by mimicry within the environment, thanks to his hand-painted outfit that will become the starting point of games, fancy dressing- the highlight of this very special birthday party. Children will chose among an array of costumes whether enabling them to hide in Liu Bolin's photographs collection or stand out by wearing the garden-inspired prints. « Our work ranges from concrete proposals to manifestos. We are looking for forms that offer different interpretations. Matter is at the heart of our concerns. Our production tackles a contradiction . . . We imagine more objects to make less objects. »

Blending digital & artisanal techniques: Julio

 French designer Luce Couillet focused on product-design studies at ESAD in Reims, before experimenting with textile creation at ENSCI-Les Ateliers in Paris.Her « Julio » mobiles are hand-woven, crafted using both digital (laser-cutting) and artisanal techniques. Each ellipse is assembled piece by piece and woven on a loom in a rising-descending manner, in order to create a hypnotic, optical game of shadows. The mobile seems to vibrate, displaying shadow games as the mobiles crisscross each other. Made of wood or of paper, the Julio mobile was originally designed by Luce Couillet for and presented at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, on the occasion of the « Conversations » exhibition. All mobiles are custom-made and limited to eight pieces. (…)

Did you know about Isamu Noguchi’s hidden passion?

Did you know that, for over three decades, Martha Graham danced on and around abstract sculptures designed by Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988)? Yes, the father of the Freeform Sofa and the most famous coffee-table in the history of modern design, also a world-renowned sculptor, and the Grande dame of Modern dance had a perfect connection. A purely professional one, that is… Their first collaboration was for her 1935 “Frontier,” where western landscape had been suggested by a simple fence and two stretched lengths of rope designed by Isamu Noguchi. (…)