Streamliners: the golden age of lifestyle & design

"Always travel in style": in February 2018, the Victoria & Albert museum will re-imagine the golden age of ocean travel with "Ocean Liners: Speed & Style", an exhibition born from the collaboration between the museum and Viking Cruises. Co-organised by the V&A in London and the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, it is the first ever exhibition to explore the design and cultural impact of the ocean liner on an international scale. It will explore all aspects of ship design from ground-breaking engineering, architecture and interiors to the fashion and lifestyle aboard. Showcasing over 250 objects, including paintings, sculpture, and ship models, alongside objects from shipyards, wall panels, furniture, fashion, textiles, photographs, posters and film. It will display objects never-before-seen in Europe, and reunite objects not seen together since on-board these spectacular vessels, which revolutionised ocean travel from the mid-19th century to the late 20th century.

Imminent Domain: Designing the Life of Tomorrow

Good designers explore how we will, but also how we should live in the future. In an era of unprecedented innovation in science and technology, how do designers respond to the constant paradigm shift in our lives? In 2013, the Asia Society Hong Kong Center organized its first design exhibition, Imminent Domain: Designing the Life of Tomorrow, to explore the heart of this matter, with 12 Hong Kong designers provoking new ideas about lifestyle. Traveling to the National Design Centre in Singapore (16 Jan- 28 Feb.), this smaller-scale exhibition continues this goal with 3 selected designers from the original group of 12 – Nicolas Cheng, Yeung Chin (see above, "Breathe In & Out To Plastic Surgery") and Dylan Kwok. What connects their designs is the common exploration of the (dis)continuation between the current and future ways of living. Cheng acquired the techniques from China to produce a set of cloisonné vessels that reminds the viewers of the encroaching forces of mass production in our age. Yeung’s inflatable garments challenge the society’s dominant formula of skinny-equals-beautiful. Kwok uses his reflective houses and specially made postcards to raise questions related to the boundaries of design and our lives in the future.

In No Particular Order II, Dutch Design Week 2015

During Dutch Design Week (17–25 October 2015), Creative Industries Fund NL will organize the exhibition In No Particular Order for the second time, showcasing work by 38 up-and-coming designers (fashion, product & graphic design, architecture…). The curator, Agata Jaworska, uses 38 different perspectives and projects to "provide insight into a new generation of designers". Besides showcasing their work, this year Jaworska uncovers underlying mechanisms and structures as well.  (…)

Alissa Coe & Mjolk: City of Makers

Alissa Coe is the gifted porcelain artist behind quite a lot of famous designers' creations, such as Luca Nichetto's Sucabaruca coffee set - among many other brilliant achievements. Toronto-based concept store Mjölk ("Say Mi-Yelk!") will showcase her first solo exhibition from from May 6th to June 3rd. A nice tribute to the hands actually giving life to mere ideas, whose talent is too often ignored. Details to be found here.

50 years of David Bowie by Helen Green

Spanning a 50-year career, graphic designer and illustrator Helen Green compiled all of David Bowie's most impressive looks to celebrate five decades of success, from Ziggy Stardust to the Thin White Duke. By the way, if you happen to be in Paris between March 3 and May 31, don't miss David Bowie is…, a huge retrospective exhibition at la Philarmonie de Paris and previously showcased at the Victoria&Albert museum in London. He will never get old.

Anne Fabricius Møller’s first class trash: Street Print

Vinçon is exhibiting Danish designer Anne Fabricius Møller's Street Print designs, made for MindCraft14 (previously showcased in Milan). Street Print is a 1.5 x 10 metre length of cotton printed with objects found in the street (some have been run over, coarse and filthy, but their imprints are remarkably poetic and delicate). The fine quality of the fabric strikes a contrast to the coarse grey asphalt where they were found. The prints are reproduced in a composition along a central axis and a certain degree of pattern symmetry around it. The composition was inspired by English etchings from the 1600s depicting natural objects in more or less symmetrical compositions.

These were the Days…

Thanks to their daughter, Paula, Robin & Lucienne Day (star designer couple whose input to the British Modern design is equivalent to what Charles & Ray Eames brought to the US) are in the limelight again. London-based design store twentytwentyone is hosting a selling exhibition of almost a hundred pieces of furniture and objects from Robin and Lucienne Day’s home. The designers, who spent 70 years living together (until Lucienne's death in 2010, followed a few months later by Robin Day's), collected or made each of those pieces, gathered and exhibited for the first time.