Asian Subconscious

Exhibited as part of Singapore Design Week, "Asian Subconscious" is a series of artworks by Singaporean graphic designers, curated by design studio Kult3D, in collaboration with Hong Kong-based store Kapok and furniture and product design range Industry+. Each designer, up-and-coming artist or well-known local talent, expressed their vision using images and icons from Asian architecture, typography, packaging and food to create their posters. Living far from Singapore? Don't worry, you can purchase these limited edition posters from Kult's online store.

Shigeru Ban wins the 2014 Pritzker Architecture Prize

Japanese architect Shigeru Ban has won the 2014 Pritzker Architecture Prize, the top award in that field. In France, Shigeru Ban designed the Metz Centre Pompidou museum (see below), with an undulating white roof supported by wooden latticework. His works are known for using low-cost materials, often locally sourced: He unveiled last summer the Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand (pictured above). Singaporeans will remember his Containart Pavilion for the Singapore Biennale of Architecture in 2008, aninstallation built with 150 shipping containers and recyclable paper tubes, in Marina Bay.

Sanctuary of Topsy Turvy, Singapore

Photographer Yuki Onodera was born in Japan in 1962. She lives and works in Paris - but Singaporeans can admire her photographs at the 2902 Gallery . The Sanctuary of Topsy Turvy, her first solo exhibition in Singapore, presents works made over a decade. Fun, personal, hybrid pieces of art. Onodera was awarded both Higashikawa and Ihei Kimura prizes in Japan, and the coveted Prix Niepce in France. Only a few days left, so grab this opportunity (2902 Gallery until Feb. 28).

Soldeville: Memories of Bugis Street & Boogie Nights

Upon arrival in Singapore, we spent a couple of months in the Bugis neighbourhood. I soon grew fascinated by its colourful story. From the 1950's to 1980's, Bugis Street was known in the whole world for its nightly parade of the flamboyantly-attired transgendered community - a one-of-a-kind attraction in Asia. French photographer Alain Soldeville stopped there in 1980, a young man then touring Asia and Australia. He recounts memories of the moving encounters he made, unveiling a side of Singapore history that many might be unfamiliar with. Recently, Soldeville came accross the long-forgotten, numerous pictures he had taken. The following illustrations are just a few among many jewels. Go and enjoy a trip down memory lane at the OBJECTIFS Gallery before March 13th. "Looking back", the photographer reflects, "I believe I meant those photos to be portraits of these people I had come to consider friends, wishing to show their fragility, their humanity rather than documenting a situation, news style." (…)

Charles & Ray Eames in Singapore: Essential Eames

Charles & Ray Eames: Of course you know their designs by heart - they're absolute design royalty, so to speak. And you wonder if this exhibition - held at the ArtScience Museum, Marina Bay Sands until January - is worth visiting? "Essential Eames" ("A Herman Miller exhibition", says the baseline, leaving but few doubts about the promotional aspect of the event) was set up with the help of the designers' grandson, Eames Demetrios. And it shows (or so I liked to think) in the intimate dimension of the exhibition; a wide array of photographs, an almost too-sweet-to-be-true proposal letter from Charles Eames, a design professor at the Cranbrook Academy of Arts, to Miss Bernice (AKA "Ray") Kaiser, a glamorous shot of Charles Eames - a James Bond look-alike - and Eero Saarinen in tuxedos (1940) are among the highlights. How they et & matched, their design process, the objects, the houses (real ones, and of cards), the propaganda "Glimpses of America" movie... Yes, everything is to be found here. Somehow, though, haven't we already seen and heard a bit too much? No real surprise there. What would have been really exciting? A "cross-exhibition" with their British alter egos, Robin & Lucienne Day. THAT would be something (sigh... but check the pictures after the jump anyway).