Loewe’s strange tribute to Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Loewe x Mackintosh - This capsule collection may leave the fans of the famed "Glasgow Four" a bit puzzled... To mark the visionary designer and architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh's 150 birthday - and following the dramatic fire that destroyed his masterpiece, the Glasgow School of Art-, Loewe has just unveiled a tribute collection. Jonathan Anderson, the artistic director of the renowned Spanish luxury brand, has widely spoken about his fascination with the arts and crafts movement, himself an avid collector of works by William Morris and Charles Rennie Mackintosh. But as much as one can admire Ms Cranston's tearoom rose pattern, was it necessary to design an all-over patterned garment? Yes, it looks awkward. Likewise, Mackintosh's most famous geometrical patterns have been used very literally, leaving no space for re-interpretation whatsoever. Glaswegians coined a term that could apply to those: "Mockintosheries". (...)

Re-designing William Morris… on your iPad

Developed by games designer Sophia George during her residence at the V&A museum in London, the Strawberry Thief game (that you can download for free from the App store here) was inspired by the William Morris pattern of the same name in the Museum’s British Galleries - so famous it had been featured on a stamp in 1982. "To be appointed as the first ever Victoria & Albert Games Designer in Residence", says the designer, "was a dream come true. The V&A is leading the way by embracing computer games as a creative activity and by opening up its collection for interpretation by a game designer. I used the history of British design shown in the Britain 1500-1900 galleries as a starting point for my research, and after weeks of research decided to focus on the William Morris textile pieces that are on display in Gallery 125g. (…) The aim of the residency was to release a finished game following a period of game production at Abertay University after my 6 months at the V&A. I wanted this game to offer a new and exciting interpretation of the V&A collections, as well as encouraging visitor participation and learning from the Britain 1500-1900 galleries." (…)